Fish Tales: Traditions and Challenges of Seafood in Oregon

Date: 

Thursday, January 19, 2017 - 6:00pm

CONTACT: Karim Shumaker   
PHONE: 541-247-2741  
E-MAIL: kshumaker@socc.edu

PORT ORFORD, OR
 
Oregonians love the wild beauty of our 363 miles of coastline, but finding truly local seafood can be hard, even on the coast. The US imports approximately 90 percent of its seafood and ships out nearly as much to the global market. Why aren’t we eating more local seafood, now that preserving and distribution technologies are the most sophisticated they have ever been? Why do we consider seafood more a delicacy now than it has been in the past?

This is the focus of “Fish Tales: Traditions and Challenges of Seafood in Oregon,” a free conversation with Jennifer Burns Bright on Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 6:00 PM at the OSU Port Orford Field Station, 444 Jackson St. This program is hosted by Southwestern Oregon Community College in partnership with OSU Port Orford Field Station and sponsored by Oregon Humanities.

Bright is a food and travel writer based in Port Orford, Oregon. She recently retired from teaching at the University of Oregon, where she researched desire in twentieth-century literature, led a faculty research group in the emerging discipline of food studies, and won a national pedagogy award for a team-taught, interdisciplinary class on bread. She holds a PhD from the University of California at Irvine and a Master Food Preserver certification. As a community organizer linking local producers and consumers, Bright often speaks and teaches at events. Her writing appears in Gastronomica, Oregon Quarterly, NPR’s The Salt, AAA’s Via, and Eugene Magazine, among others.

Through the Conversation Project, Oregon Humanities offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state's future. For more information about this free community discussion, please contact Karim Shumaker at 541-247-2741 or kshumaker@socc.edu.

Oregon Humanities (921 SW Washington, Suite 150; Portland, OR 97205) connects Oregonians to ideas that change lives and transform communities. More information about Oregon Humanities’ programs and publications, which include the Conversation Project, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Idea Lab, Public Program Grants, and Oregon Humanities magazine, can be found at oregonhumanities.org. Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust.

Langlois Caroling Party

Date: 

Wednesday, December 21, 2016 -
6:30pm to 7:30pm

Join us for the Langlois Caroling Party inside the toasty Langlois Public Library Wednesday, December 21st at 6:30pm to 7:30pm.
  There will be cookies and hot mulled cider and song sheets will be provided!
 The singing will be accompanied by Simple Harmonies (Kim & Kevin Paulson).  This event is sponsored by the Friends of the Langlois Library.
  For more information call the Langlois Library at 541 348 2066. 

  Read more about Langlois Caroling Party

Recreational crabbing open from Floras Creek to California border

SALEM — The Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife announced the opening of the ocean and bay recreational crab fishery along the southern Oregon coast from Floras Creek (just north of Port Orford) to the California border.

The ocean and bay recreational crab fishery also remains open along the northern coast from Tillamook Head to the mouth of the Columbia River, including the area inside the Columbia River mouth. Tillamook Head is located between Seaside and Cannon Beach.

The 210-mile area between Tillamook Head and Floras Creek will remain closed to ocean and bay recreational crabbing due to elevated levels of domoic acid recently detected in the viscera of Dungeness crab.

Read more at the worldlink Read more about Recreational crabbing open from Floras Creek to California border

Do Pacific Northwesterners Have An Accent?

I thought this was an interesting read (even though it's from Washington State). Nothing about Crick or Creek though.   Story by

Do Pacific Northwesterners have an accent and what does it sound like? Listener Molly in Tacoma asked that question as part of KUOW's Local Wonder series. Molly never thought she had an accent until she moved to Virginia and was told she had one. Some regional accents are obvious. But many in the Pacific Northwest describe themselves as speaking “standard,” “normal,” or “plain” English. But is that really the case? What do the experts say? Luckily for us, we have one of the world’s foremost experts on Pacific Northwest English right here on the University of Washington campus. Professor Alicia Wassink is director of the school’s sociolinguistics laboratory. She laughed in response to Molly’s question, and then said yes, everybody has an accent. Ours may be subtle, but if you know what to listen for, it’s definitely there. In fact, researchers have recently examined more closely at how people speak throughout the region and are finding that accents can vary between Oregon, western and eastern Washington.

Vowels And Mergers

For decades, scholars didn’t pay much attention to how people in the Pacific Northwest spoke. Linguistic textbooks grouped everyone from the Western United States together into one regional dialect. Wassink grew up in Philadelphia, and when she arrived here 17 years ago, she suspected that wasn’t quite right. One piece of evidence? Transplants like herself sometimes misunderstood the locals. She told the story of a student from Rhode Island who, when he arrived on campus, was invited to a party. He baked a cake, which he thought was the party’s theme. “And when he got there he was shocked to discover that he had brought entirely the wrong thing to the party,” Wassink explained. “He thought that he was being invited to a ‘cake’ party, and he was being invited to a ‘keg’ party.” Wassink wanted to know whether the confusion between words like "cake" and "keg" was widespread.

Read the whole thing and listen to some audio. Read more about Do Pacific Northwesterners Have An Accent?

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