Floras Creek

Langlois makes Via Magazine: Coasting Southern Oregon

Gotta love how the article says 'Floras Lake, north of Port Orford, is a popular spot to rent a kiteboard.'

Not that Floras Lake is fed by Floras Creek that runs through Langlois.  So it goes :)

In any case we get a few sentences

More than 50 miles of rolling farmland and rugged coastline lie between the sportfishing havens of Bandon and Gold Beach. Sly signs marking tiny Langlois declare it world famous—and who’s to say it’s not? After kiteboarding on Floras Lake near Boice Cope Park, famished athletes often stop at the Langlois Market for both scrumptious hot dogs slathered with homemade sweet-hot mustard and the day’s town gossip.

Read more at http://www.viamagazine.com/road-trips/coasting-southern-oregon Read more about Langlois makes Via Magazine: Coasting Southern Oregon

Langlois Library's Author Night Video: Margaret Grundstein "Naked in the woods"

Ledbetter House Steve on Guitar & Tchanan Fiddle

Langlois Library's Author Night featured Margaret Grundstein with her first book, evocatively titled "Naked in the Woods." The author chronicles her journey of self-discovery stimulated by the desire to show that society could live in a different way. The move was sparked by the turmoil of the times- Vietam War, Kent State, etc. The first part of the books deals with the establishment of a commune in an area close to Eugene, Oregon- the trials, set backs, joys, the accomplishments. Read more about Langlois Library's Author Night Video: Margaret Grundstein "Naked in the woods"

Langlois- Coho Country

2/10/15

 

Langlois -- Coho Country

Langlois is nourished by, and centered around Floras Creek, a little-known, but highly productive salmon and steelhead stream on the southern Oregon Coast. Floras Creek is also the source of the City’s drinking water, with the water intake located just above Highway 101.

 

Each fall and winter, salmon and steelhead pour into Floras Creek and its tributaries. Some of these fish have been out in the Pacific Ocean for up to four years, ranging as far west as Alaska and Japan. When instinct urges them to return home, they align themselves with the earth’s magnetic fields and swim towards the waters north of Cape Blanco. When they finally arrive off-shore between Thanksgiving and Christmas, scientists believe they orient themselves even further by sensing the distinctive smell, or signature of Floras Creek water. These fish then cease eating, swim against the current for several days to ascend Floras Creek, and eventually spawn and die in their native stream, very near where they were born.

This miraculous process has been going on in our area for at least 15,000 years, and it is our responsibility to make sure it continues into the future.

Langlois residents have been active in restoring salmon habitat on the creek over the last 25 years. Projects up and down the creek have included:

  • Placing rock “barbs” or vanes in the creek to reduce erosion and sedimentation.

  • Providing off-stream watering systems to pull cattle and sheep away from the creek.

  • Fencing out livestock to protect riparian areas (floodplains and lands next to the creek).

  • Planting native tree species to hold soil, provide shade, reduce water temperatures, and provide macroinvertebrates (caddis flies, mayflies, stoneflies, etc) to the stream food web.

  • Adding large whole logs to the stream in selected locations for hydrologic complexity and creating deep-water pools and refugia.

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