Why Langlois is or should be world famous

So are the citizens of Langlois delusional??

WE THINK NOT.

Reasons:

1) We take pride in the fact that the name Langlois stirs up so much interest in the pronunciation. The subject is a great ice breaker  and is often the first question asked by visitors.

Langlois is a variant of the French "L'anglais" meaning the Englishman which seems to indicate the family name started when some English showed in France post-Norman conquest era. The variations in pronunciation stem from Anglicization and then Americanization down through the years.  There are variations still among Guernsey (home of our founding family) and Jersey Islands The name is not quite on par with the Welsh town of Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwy rndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch. So really, one might  we have it easy, but  is still up for debate.  One of most accepted version is Langless stemming from a phonetic version of the 1860 Federal census of our Founding Family

 

  

  

However, the citation in Oregon's Names; How to Say Them and Where They are Located? by Bert Webber ( a well respected historian) lists the pronunciation as LANG lois.

The locals have their own take on the name: Lang lois  Langwau, Lang o ise, Lang lewis , Lang lis , Lang loy and probably more. Here are some samples from us locals. 


Langlois Mountain History Tour

Date: 

Saturday, July 15, 2017 - 10:00am

 

July 15 is the date to join a tour sponsored by the Coos History Museum. Tour agenda is as follows: Meet at the Bandon History Museum on that Saturday at 10:00 a.m. for an hour visit, then board a bus for Langlois Mountain in north Curry County. We will travel up Bethel Creek Rd. through ranch country with views of the coastal plain and the Pacific Ocean behind us. At the intersection with Langlois Mountain Road, we will travel east to the end of the county road, and then west to our lunch stop at the Highland Woods, formerly the Millard School (a military prep school), where we listen to stories of the area while enjoying the catered lunch. Returning west to Langlois, we will stop for a bit of wandering through the Wild Rivers Wool Factory and the Langlois Market, home of the famous hot dogs. On the return drive to Bandon, we will take a short side trip to the New River Nature Center down New Lake Road. The tour will end around 4:00 p.m.


Tour participation is a benefit for CCHS members only. Not currently a member? Purchase your membership now to join in on this rare opportunity. Cost: $30. Please direct any questions to the tour co-leaders, Bill Mast (541-572-3685) or Anne Guerin (541-348-2269) A sign-up sheet will be available at the Coos History Museum front desk beginning June 1st. Payment over the phone (541.756.6320) or by mail (1210 North Front Street, Coos Bay, OR 97420) is available. Tour is limited to 50 participants.
Read more about Langlois Mountain History Tour

Seeking Langlois Cadman Family from across the pond.

My name is Gloria Cadman. I live in the North East of England. My Cadman ancestors, however, came from Suffolk in East Anglia, a region comprising the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex. Though geographically close to London, Suffolk was and remains a largely rural part of England. My grandfather was Jesse Cadman and he and his two older brothers, Herbert and Arthur, were born and brought up in the town of Wickham Market. Their parents were Arthur and Ellen (nee Woolnough).The boys were born into a family with a long tradition of farming, though Arthur Cadman was a stonemason.  Of the three brothers, only the middle one, Arthur, stayed in Suffolk his whole life. He became a master saddler – in a county known for its horses, particularly working horses, this was a secure line of work. My grandfather, though a keen gardener, was also not inclined to follow his ancestors in working the land. Instead, he learned to drive and left Suffolk before the First World War, becoming first a chauffeur. Eventually, he and my grandmother settled in Buckinghamshire, where they raised seven children, and he managed the Taplow Bus Company, later absorbed into Thames Valley Transport. My father, Anthony, was the second child and oldest son, born in 1917. While my grandparents were alive they kept in touch with Jesse’s oldest brother who had settled in the USA, but that contact was lost when they and my father died. Jesse died in 1957, my father followed in 1973, and my grandmother Winifred died in 1979. All I could really remember was that there were people related to me with the name Cadman somewhere in Oregon, and that one of my father’s cousins had married a woman called Gloria, so at some point in the past there were two people called Gloria Cadman in the world! Only recently have I started a family history, using mainly a genealogy site called Find My Past.

My grandfather’s oldest brother, Herbert, who was born in 1884, is recorded in the British Census of 1911. He is described as a ‘groom’, probably working for someone with an estate. However, he left England in 1911. I believe he went first to Canada, probably because travelling to Canada was cheaper that to the USA. In 1912, aged 28, he crossed from Canada into Vermont, USA. (He is listed in ‘Manifests of Passengers Arriving in the St Albans, Vermont, District through Canadian Pacific and Atlantic Ports, 1895- 1954, Nov- Dec 1912’).  At some point he married Letitia, who according to the 1930 US Census, had also been born in Britain, possibly in 1892 or 1893, though according to her death certificate she was born on August 20th 1891. The 1930 US Census tells us that Herbert and Letitia were then living in Fat Elk, Coos County, Oregon, and had three children Sidney A. born in 1918, Edwin born in 1921 and Dorothy J. born in 1928. These three children were my father’s first cousins. However, by 1940 the family was living in Langlois, Curry County, Oregon. I found a record of Herbert’s death in 1975 and then the trail went cold.

Very recently I decided to google ‘Langlois’ and found www.worldfamouslanglois.com I clicked on the ‘contact us’ link and left a message, not really expecting a reply. In fact, a very helpful lady, Deanna McDermott, emailed back very quickly with information and then sent some pictures, which revealed that Herbert in 1939 was Chairman of the Board of Directors of Langlois Union High School. Other pictures showed Herbert with a champion Jersey cow, Herbert’s son Sidney with his wife Vera Clarke Cadman, his son Edwin with his wife Gloria and his wife Letitia (known as Nettie) on the occasion of her 90th birthday with Sidney and Dorothy Cadman Sabin. The trail has for now gone cold, so if anyone reading this is a descendant of Herbert via Sidney, Edwin or Dorothy, or knows anything about them, I would love to hear from you. Until Deanna sent the pictures, I had not seen any photographs of my American relatives and I was moved to see a likeness between Sidney and my father. I can be contacted on gcadman@sky.com

Some pages from the Langlois Centennial Book:

PDF iconcadman.pdf

PDF iconcadman2.pdf

Read more about Seeking Langlois Cadman Family from across the pond.

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