Recreational crabbing open from Floras Creek to California border

SALEM — The Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife announced the opening of the ocean and bay recreational crab fishery along the southern Oregon coast from Floras Creek (just north of Port Orford) to the California border.

The ocean and bay recreational crab fishery also remains open along the northern coast from Tillamook Head to the mouth of the Columbia River, including the area inside the Columbia River mouth. Tillamook Head is located between Seaside and Cannon Beach.

The 210-mile area between Tillamook Head and Floras Creek will remain closed to ocean and bay recreational crabbing due to elevated levels of domoic acid recently detected in the viscera of Dungeness crab.

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Do Pacific Northwesterners Have An Accent?

I thought this was an interesting read (even though it's from Washington State). Nothing about Crick or Creek though.   Story by

Do Pacific Northwesterners have an accent and what does it sound like? Listener Molly in Tacoma asked that question as part of KUOW's Local Wonder series. Molly never thought she had an accent until she moved to Virginia and was told she had one. Some regional accents are obvious. But many in the Pacific Northwest describe themselves as speaking “standard,” “normal,” or “plain” English. But is that really the case? What do the experts say? Luckily for us, we have one of the world’s foremost experts on Pacific Northwest English right here on the University of Washington campus. Professor Alicia Wassink is director of the school’s sociolinguistics laboratory. She laughed in response to Molly’s question, and then said yes, everybody has an accent. Ours may be subtle, but if you know what to listen for, it’s definitely there. In fact, researchers have recently examined more closely at how people speak throughout the region and are finding that accents can vary between Oregon, western and eastern Washington.

Vowels And Mergers

For decades, scholars didn’t pay much attention to how people in the Pacific Northwest spoke. Linguistic textbooks grouped everyone from the Western United States together into one regional dialect. Wassink grew up in Philadelphia, and when she arrived here 17 years ago, she suspected that wasn’t quite right. One piece of evidence? Transplants like herself sometimes misunderstood the locals. She told the story of a student from Rhode Island who, when he arrived on campus, was invited to a party. He baked a cake, which he thought was the party’s theme. “And when he got there he was shocked to discover that he had brought entirely the wrong thing to the party,” Wassink explained. “He thought that he was being invited to a ‘cake’ party, and he was being invited to a ‘keg’ party.” Wassink wanted to know whether the confusion between words like "cake" and "keg" was widespread.

Read the whole thing and listen to some audio. Read more about Do Pacific Northwesterners Have An Accent?

Marine Debris workshop schedule for Gold Beach

Date: 

Saturday, December 3, 2016 -
6:00pm to 8:30pm

Gold Beach, OR – Southwestern Oregon Community College is offering a Marine Debris workshop in Gold Beach. This workshop will explore how marine debris is generated, what happens to it, and its effect on the ocean ecosystem.

 The worldwide production of plastics and other immortal materials has changed the face of our oceans. Marine debris has had a profound impact on marine life, both as a material and a raft for organisms.  Debris from the Eastern Northern Pacific as well as California and the Pacific Northwest reaches Oregon shores, bringing with it both open ocean species and species from coasts of origin.

The Friday evening discussion will cover types of debris, the origin and fate of debris, and how debris acts as long term rafts for marine organisms. Saturday morning, students are encouraged to walk a beach of their choice and photograph and/or collect debris (low tide is at 7:30 a.m.). The class will then meet to look at what was found, consider possible sources of the items, as well as identify and discuss any species present on the debris. Part of the discussion will center how to determine the source of individual items.

 The lecture is scheduled for Friday, December 2, 2016 from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m. at Southwestern’s Gold Beach Center. Saturday, December 3, after an early morning beach walk on their own to collect debris, students will meet from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Cost for the workshop is $35.00. Pre-registration is required and can be made by calling the Gold Beach Center at 541-247-2741. Read more about Marine Debris workshop schedule for Gold Beach

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