World famous Langlois

The True Story of the Famous Hot Dog

Hot dog count
Hot dog count
The True Story of the Famous Langlois Hot Dog

 

After the expansion of the Langlois Market in " 1981", the need for a deli was a must due to the Tucker saw mill gang. * The mill employed quite a few workers all looking for something to eat at their morning and afternoon breaks . Truckers going up and down 101 seemed to be hungry as well As we pondered on what to sell, my mother-in-law Muriel Sweet suggested our selling hot dogs using her famous mustard recipe. She knew people enjoyed her mustard from all the compliments she received every time served it at picnics.

During the course of the past thirty-three years, our hot dogs have become famous throughout the area. It is the combination of serving a very delicious frankfurter made with beef and pork, Muriel’s' home- made mustard and just the right pickle combination. It is the word- of -mouth advertizing that seems to bring people from far and near to sample our dogs. People will drop in and say, " I just have to try one of your hot dogs that I heard about." Some people even go as far as to say they are " world famous."

Submitted by Lee Pestana of the Langlois Market.

*Tucker Mill: Of historic importance. 1st established on Langlois Mountain in the 1940s.

Moved to Langlois in the 1950s, closed in the late 1990s. The mill employed 19 men in the early 1980s having provided the men of Langlois gainful employment for almost 50 years. (Strain, Floras Creek Precinct.)

 

Photo confirmations of the acclaimed "dog"                                                                      

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World Travelers Making Langlois Famous

The world travelers, in particular, the bicylists love our library as well as do other visitors from our states. Considering that it is estimated that 6000 bicylists make the Oregon Coast Bike Tour annually, it is no wonder we are on the world's radar.

When the new library was completed in 2002, no one dreamed it would such a magnet- not only greatly visible from Highway 101, but so enticing as well, not only for the atmosphere and Internet, but apparently for the bathroom filled with art.

The visitor comments speak for themselves. 

                                                                     

guest book 10

                                                                     

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Writing Around Langlois

Writing Around Langlois

It’s no wonder that Langlois is populated with photographers, painters, craftspeople, and storytellers. Inspiration is everywhere. I’ve written three books in a series about a young woman caddie at a small-town golf resort, and though the stories are fiction, the people and scenes are glimpses of the real thing. Sometimes the realities are very close to my fictional characterizations, but I'm not telling which ones.

As for being “world famous,” one would have to understand this community’s notion of fame. My books have sold in parts of Europe, but what translates as important to my friends and neighbors is seeing books in the library with the name of someone they know on the cover. So when locals keep asking me, “How’s the new book coming?” I am honor-bound to get back to work.

I tell readers that you don’t have to know anything about golf to read my Lainey Tidwell novels, but you’d better be able to appreciate small towns. (Langlois in particular is featured in chapter 17 of Looping in Limbo.) In a different vein, my nonfiction, No Broken Bones, tells of the battle between an unjust bureaucracy and my family’s tenacious, fighting spirit ̶ something small-town people know all too well.

It’s hard to say what will inspire my next book. In Langlois, there is no shortage of material.

Ginney Etherton

www.ginneytherton.weebly.com

www.facebook.com/loopingbooks

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Why our wool is famous

Langlois is world famous in the wool industry for its incredibly clean wool.  We average around 144 inches of rain a year (that's 12 FEET of water!) and most of our sheep flocks are pasture raised, no barns or shelter, so all that rain hits the wool and washes it very clean.  We shear in the spring in between rainstorms and the resulting wool has a reputation with the wool pool and woolen mills around the countr for being very clean.  For instance, wool sheared in the Willamette Valley will lose nearly half its weight when washed  and local coastal wool will lose less than 1/3 its weight.  The other factor, of course, is that the list of sheep breeds that can survive 144 inches of rain a year is very short!   They need to be practically amphibious.  We have 24 different breeds of sheep in Coos and Curry counties, but the Coopworth and Romney breeds predominate.

Coopworth sheep
Coopworth sheep

 

 

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